Krista Mezzadri  

Krista Mezzadri (1987, Dayton, Ohio USA) is a visual artist who lives and works outside of Buffalo, New York. Mezzadri explores the movement of repetition, utilizing the juxtapositions of texture and translucency, silhouetted depth and distinct flatness. Her interest lies in the convergence of process, materials, and elements of nature. Mezzadri’s works maintain a monochromaticity to emphasize the tones, forms, and texture within the transparent layers; she encourages imperfect tactility to become a feature of the message. Her varied approach to the monotype printmaking process allows for spontaneous characteristics in an otherwise precise methodology of creation, and she continues to maintain an experimental approach to her work. 

Her work involve a process that combines trace-monotype printmaking with constructive collage-making. The materials she uses include almost weightless (5gsm) Japanese tissue paper that is typically used in book conservation. When layered and collaged onto a wood panel with rice paste, the prints dissolve together, and into the panel underneath, turning the lamination dimensional yet planarly flat. Her intention is for new forms to appear when the layers merge; her interest lies in working with these shadows.The predominant geometry in her work is purposely inexact. 

Kmuntitled October2021Crop

Krista Mezzadri — 

Krista Mezzadri (1987, Dayton, Ohio USA) is a visual artist who lives and works outside of Buffalo, New York. Mezzadri explores the movement of repetition, utilizing the juxtapositions of texture and translucency, silhouetted depth and distinct flatness. Her interest lies in the convergence of process, materials, and elements of nature. Mezzadri’s works maintain a monochromaticity to emphasize the tones, forms, and texture within the transparent layers; she encourages imperfect tactility to become a feature of the message. Her varied approach to the monotype printmaking process allows for spontaneous characteristics in an otherwise precise methodology of creation, and she continues to maintain an experimental approach to her work. 

Her work involve a process that combines trace-monotype printmaking with constructive collage-making. The materials she uses include almost weightless (5gsm) Japanese tissue paper that is typically used in book conservation. When layered and collaged onto a wood panel with rice paste, the prints dissolve together, and into the panel underneath, turning the lamination dimensional yet planarly flat. Her intention is for new forms to appear when the layers merge; her interest lies in working with these shadows.The predominant geometry in her work is purposely inexact. 

Kmuntitled October2021Crop